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    Top 5 Mistakes On Remote Job Resumes

    Top 5 Mistakes On Remote Job Resumes

    The recent surge in remote jobs is here to stay, and avoiding these errors may help you land an at-home position.

    After a year plus of working from home, many professionals have little to no interest in coming back to the office. 65% prefer to work fully remote while 33% would like a hybrid arrangement. Nearly 3 in 5 said they would absolutely quit if they weren’t allowed to work from home post-pandemic.

    To help those searching for a permanent remote job, the career coaches at FlexJobs have pinpointed 5 of the most common mistakes they see job seekers make on their remote job resumes, and how to fix them.

    FlexJobs also maintains an updated list of the top 25 companies hiring for remote jobs, as another helpful resource. FlexJobs’ career coaches would be happy to discuss this further or offer an exclusive quote to accompany the piece!

    Top 5 Mistakes on Remote Job Resumes

    1. Not including or highlighting relevant remote work experience 

    Add “remote” or “partial remote” next to your job title or location on your resume to show that you worked remotely. You can also include it as a percentage, such as 80% remote or 25% remote. If you only worked remotely during the pandemic and then went back into the office, you could  include a line in your bullet section that says something like: “Successfully worked remotely from March 2020 to August 2020 during the COVID-19 global pandemic.”

    This goes for volunteer experiences or school experiences as well! It doesn’t just have to be from a professional job. If you did online schooling you could say “100% remote instruction” or “100% virtual instruction.”

    FlexJobs has an in-depth tutorial on how to showcase remote work experience on your resume, such as in the summary of qualifications, location, or an entirely separate section.

    2. Having an overly formatted resume 

    Applicant tracking systems (ATS) have difficulty scanning or parsing the following formatting elements: Columns, text boxes, tables, information in headers and footers, uncommon fonts, uncommon bullet points, graphics, images, charts, graphs, and margins smaller than half an inch (.5 inches).

    Build your resume yourself — don’t use a template. You can find inspiration by looking at other people’s resumes online or find formats and templates that you like from FlexJobs’ sample resume formats. But when you start to format your resume, just make sure to start with a blank document and create it from scratch.

    3. Listing tasks instead of giving information concerning accomplishments and achievements

    As you would in an interview, use the STAR method to turn a task on your resume into an accomplishment. In your resume bullets, think of the impact you had at each job, and then write about the Situation, Task, Action, and the Result.

    What were the results of each of your actions? What was accomplished because you completed that task? What goals did you reach? Who was helped? What was improved? How did the company benefit as a result of you doing that task? Accomplishments and achievements don’t have to be numbers, though that is nice to include if it’s possible. You can talk about improving, reducing, reorganizing, streamlining, and impacting in a way that sounds meaningful.

    4. Not tailoring the Professional Summary and Key Skills sections to the job posting

    Job seekers may not be aware of the importance of tailoring the Professional Summary and Key Skills section of the resume for EVERY job application. This means that you will need to revise this section of the resume EVERY time you apply to have it reflect the keywords, phrases, and skills stated within the job posting. An estimated 70% of resumes are screened out from ATS searches because the resume did not include the keywords, skills, and requirements noted in the job posting. Be sure to identify the keywords and skills from the job posting and incorporate them into your Professional Summary and Key Skills section, using the phrasing and terminology from the job posting.

    5. Putting contact information in a header or footer

    Applicant tracking systems (ATS) cannot read information if it’s in the header or footer of your document. Be sure to put your contact information at the top of your document on the first page and include your city, state, zip code, email address, and phone number. If you’d like to have your contact information on page two, which isn’t really necessary anymore because resumes aren’t printed out on paper, you could add a header to page two only.

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